2015 Annual Show of Begonias in Tropical Splendour


Click here to see the 2012 Annual Begonia Slideshow and Gallery.

Queensland Begonia Slideshow

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Date

Venue

Event

21 FEB
Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens Auditorium Annual Begonia Show

Begonias in Tropical Splendour is the theme for the begonia display.

The show is a “One Day Affair” and the Admission fee is $3.

This is the largest and only show of Begonias in Queensland.

The 2015 Annual Show of Begonias is held at Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens Auditorium from 9am to 4pm on 21st (Saturday) of February, where visitors can:

  1. Admire quality begonias in many competition classes.
  2. View artistic static displays of diverse begonias, including endangered species, new hybrids and rare varieties.
  3. Meet experienced growers and dedicated members of the society.
  4. Purchase many varieties of begonias not available through normal nurseries.
  5. Buy books published by the society.
  6. Make inquiries or seek assistance at the information desk.
  7. Participate in the “Name This Begonia” competition.
  8. Witness the award of competition trophies.
  9. Attend a demonstration workshop and PowerPoint presentation run by Mrs Ivy McFarlane, a very experienced grower and hybridist.
  10. Win raffle prizes.
  11. Enjoy light refreshments.

Contact

For further details, please contact the Show Organiser Shevanti Seneviratne on (07) 5502 2579 (after hours) or by email to Email: shevantis@cdmasiapacific.com

President – Enid Henderson
Ph (07) 3359 4319

Secretary – Michael O’ Dea
Mobile 04 6837 3123

In their natural environments, begonia species originate mainly in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world, including South and Central America, Africa and Asia.

Sadly many of these natural habitats are being bulldozed, and the Queensland Begonia Society members are dedicated to growing the species that would otherwise disappear.

No begonia has ever been discovered growing naturally in Australia. However, we have many keen begonia growers who do have, amongst their collections, many of the threatened species from other lands, which will be featured at the show.

On display will be hundreds of the beautiful hybrid varieties that are favourites of most gardeners who love the colourful and varied foliage and flowers of these spectacular plants. Many of these hybrids have been created and introduced by our own Queensland members and also other Australian growers.

Annual Begonia Show from the Past

Click here to see the 2012 Annual Begonia Slideshow and Gallery.

Click here to see the Videos of the 2012 Annual Begonia Show.

Floral Divider

Greetings!


Queensland Begonia Society Logo
Begonias

Artistic Begonia DisplayArtistic Begonia Display Begonia EnsembleBegonia Ensemble Begonia in Hanging PotBegonia in Hanging Pot

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias


Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias
Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: This is grown in canada and I took several years to create. The flowers are not on the rhizome, but on the elongated stems. The stems are not flat to the soil in this hybrid. This is not FAKE! 23 February at 02:14

John Boggan Very interesting, I’ve never seen a double-fllowered rex hybrid but there’s no reason why they shouldn’t exist. Come to think of it, I can’t think of any begonia from any of the Asian groups that have double flowers.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses Sorry Ive not replied, James Missier, the rex line I was working with had a few flowers with extra tiny petals, so over the years I kept selecting and backcrossing these. The originals came from my mum, who was a begonias nut for years. They were not named back then, and so complex that the actual ID was obscure even then. Of course when I started to see results the excitement rose and a veritable sweat broke upon my weary brow, but I kept going. It’s all about the journey of discovery. These are addictive. About lowland growing I don’t know where you live, I don’t have any knowledge how they would do, but my summers are hot and dry. No mildew problems at all, so far. Cheers!

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: Yes but have not sold any, just playing with it to see the best ways. The line also was selected for years to have flowers on top. I think the poor rex bunch have been a bit messed up with breeders not wanting to see flowers, or maybe the flowers were not long lasting so I understand this from a growers viewpoint. I wanted to change all that and have both long lasting flowers that were presented on top.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: John Boggan, thanks for your thoughts. Here is an experimental cross with tuberous. Only one or two in a thousand turned out to have decent flowers that lasted and were of quality.

New Begonia Species Discovered at Borneo in 2013


Apparently, this species is a new Begonia very recently discovered in Borneo, Malaysia in 2013. It seems to be a rhizomatous species. Notice the unusual colouration and margin.

Does anyone have any information on the species, including texts, photos and videos?

Begonia sinuata var pantiensis with pinkish flowers form spotted!!!


Originally posted on Orchids and the City:

Begonia sinuata which is also known as the sparkling begonia is widely distibuted in parts of South East Asia – from Thailand to unfortunately only to Johor without crossing over to Singapore. It is one of the most common begonia in Malaysia and are oftern found on damp vertical rock faces near waterfalls. This begonia is the only annual begonia in the Peninsular of Malaysia. It usually dies towards the end of the year and they regenerate by seeds and also from its basal tuber and leaf bulbils. There are 2 varieties that are recognised by world foremost Begonia Expert -Ruth Kiew.

First is the var sinuata -which has deeply incised leaf while the second is the var pantiensis which has a nice maple leaf form!!

Begonia sinuata var pantiensis is able to adapt to Singapore weather.

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Begonia sinuata var pantiensis in- situ.

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Another pic of Begonia sinuata var pantiensis…

View original 25 more words

2014 Annual Show of Begonias


Click here to see the 2012 Annual Begonia Slideshow and Gallery.

Date

Venue

Event

22 FEB
Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens Auditorium Annual Begonia Show

The 2014 Annual Show of Begonias is held at Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens Auditorium from 9am to 4pm on 22nd (Saturday) of February, where visitors can:

  1. Admire quality begonias in many competition classes.
  2. View artistic static displays of diverse begonias.
  3. Meet experienced growers and dedicated members of the society.
  4. Purchase many varieties of begonias not available through normal nurseries.
  5. Buy books published by the society.
  6. Make inquiries or seek assistance at the information desk.
  7. Participate in the “Name This Begonia” competition.
  8. Witness the award of competition trophies.
  9. Listen to a special guest speaker, the well-known horticulturist, Clair Levander, talking about begonias and answering questions on any gardening topic, at 10.30am.
  10. Attend a demonstration workshop run by the President, Mrs Carmel Browne, at 11.30am.
  11. Win raffle prizes.
  12. Enjoy light refreshments.

Annual Begonia Show from the Past

Click here to see the 2012 Annual Begonia Slideshow and Gallery.

Click here to see the Videos of the 2012 Annual Begonia Show.

Floral Divider

RHS Garden Wisley Visitors Vote On Their Favourite Begonia / RHS Gardening


via RHS Garden Wisley visitors vote on their favourite begonia / RHS Gardening.

Begonia hemsleyana: SPECIES TALK – MARCH MEETING


Begonia hemsleyana, Bot. Mag. 125: t. 7685 (1899).
Source: Curtis Botanical Magazine; Author: Hooker

Carmel Browne presented the Species Talk on 16 March 2013.

The area of distribution of this species extends from northern Burma to the Chinese province of Yunnan in moist, upland forests.

B. hemsleyana was introduced to Kew Gardens by way of seed collected in south Yunnan in 1899. It was named in honour of William Hemsley who worked on Chinese plants at Kew at that time.

B. hemsleyana is rhizomatous, jointed at or below the soil with erect stems. The leaf blade is palmately compound, glossy green, sparsely hairy between the veins, paler green beneath with a reddish tinge. The petioles are pink with short, woolly hairs. Flowers are pink and fragrant.

I chose to speak on this species today because this is only the second time it has flowered for me. It has been described as difficult. From my experiences, I have found it requires a cool, moist, well lit situation with good air movement. Because it naturally produces short, closely spaced stems, good air circulation is essential to keep fungal diseases at bay. A well-drained premium mix that is allowed to dry between waterings suits B. hemsleyana.

B. hemsleyana, B. rex, B. pedatifida and B. circumlobata are closely related and all belong to section Platycentrum. B. hemsleyana has been successfully crossed with Rex Cultorum begonias. B. ‘Raspberry Swirl’, B. ‘Picasso’ and B. ‘Hula Skirt’ are the results of such crossings. I do not know if these have ever been grown in Australia.