Tag Archive | Tuberous Begonia

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias


Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias
Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: This is grown in canada and I took several years to create. The flowers are not on the rhizome, but on the elongated stems. The stems are not flat to the soil in this hybrid. This is not FAKE! 23 February at 02:14

John Boggan Very interesting, I’ve never seen a double-fllowered rex hybrid but there’s no reason why they shouldn’t exist. Come to think of it, I can’t think of any begonia from any of the Asian groups that have double flowers.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses Sorry Ive not replied, James Missier, the rex line I was working with had a few flowers with extra tiny petals, so over the years I kept selecting and backcrossing these. The originals came from my mum, who was a begonias nut for years. They were not named back then, and so complex that the actual ID was obscure even then. Of course when I started to see results the excitement rose and a veritable sweat broke upon my weary brow, but I kept going. It’s all about the journey of discovery. These are addictive. About lowland growing I don’t know where you live, I don’t have any knowledge how they would do, but my summers are hot and dry. No mildew problems at all, so far. Cheers!

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias [1]

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: Yes but have not sold any, just playing with it to see the best ways. The line also was selected for years to have flowers on top. I think the poor rex bunch have been a bit messed up with breeders not wanting to see flowers, or maybe the flowers were not long lasting so I understand this from a growers viewpoint. I wanted to change all that and have both long lasting flowers that were presented on top.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: John Boggan, thanks for your thoughts. Here is an experimental cross with tuberous. Only one or two in a thousand turned out to have decent flowers that lasted and were of quality.

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias [2]

RHS Garden Wisley Visitors Vote On Their Favourite Begonia / RHS Gardening


via RHS Garden Wisley visitors vote on their favourite begonia / RHS Gardening.

Begonias, Begonias


Forest Garden

I love begonias.  That may sound like a strange obsession for a “forest gardener”, but it is my strange obsession.

I remember buying a hanging basket of blooming angel wing Begonias with tiny dark burgundy and green  leaves at the  farmer’s market when I was living in a third floor walk up.  It made my small screened in porch more beautiful, and made me happy.  Since then, I’ve always had a soft spot for adding beautiful begonia plants to my collection.

There are thousands of cultivars in the genus Begonia.  Whether grown for their outrageous leaves or their abundant bright flowers, Begonias can be found from tiny to tremendous.

Begonias work in a forest garden because they appreciate shade.  Although some, like the new Dragon Wing cultivars and Begonia “Bolivienses” can take hours of sun each day, most are quite happy growing in permanent shade.  They also require very little care.  Most like to…

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Begonia: “Be Cautious and Fanciful”


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Begonia Beauties


 

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Edible Begonias


Learn about wild food with Green Deane. This video presents the begonia as an edible plant that has been grown around the world both as food and as an ornamental.


For more information including the culinary and medicinal uses of begonias as well as the recipes of “Begonia Tartlett” and “Begonia Spread“, visit Begonia Bonanza | Eat The Weeds and other things, too.

Culinary uses are found in Japan, India, Indonesia (a sauce for meat and fish), Myanmar, China (tea, salads and wild snack), Brazil, Mexico, Paraguay and the Philippines. For example, the leaves of Begonia fimbristipula, a deciduous herb with tubers 7-8 mm in diameter, are harvested and dried for brewing a beverage (tea) in Guangdong, China.

The Journal of Economic Botany has mentioned the following edible begonias:

  1. B. annulata (aka B. hatacoa)
  2. B. auriculata
  3. B. barbata
  4. B. fimbristipula (used to make a tea)
  5. B. gracilis
  6. B. grandis var evansiana
  7. B. hernandioides
  8. B. malabarica
  9. B. mannii
  10. B. palmata
  11. B. picta
  12. B. plebeja (stems peeled, sap is used to make a drink)
  13. B. rex
  14. B. roxburghii (cooked)
  15. B. semperflorens

Where have all the comic songs of yesteryear gone?


Lois Elsden

As a child I remember so many comic songs being played on the radio…or wireless as we called it then. I’m sure they were mostly of little real merit and probably not very comical  but we loved them. I can’t imagine anything more ghastly now than ‘The Laughing Policeman’ and yet it was on Children’s Favourites almost every weekend. Then here was ‘You’re A Pink Toothbrush’, ‘Does Your Chewing Gum Loose Its’ Flavour On The bedpost overnight?’, ‘My Old Man’s A Dustman’… oh , the list is endless. I was reminded of this when I took this photo in Ireland of a bed of begonias… with one lonely little viola and ‘I’m A Lonely Little Petunia In An Onion Bed’ sprang to mind.

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