Tag Archive | Rhizomatous Begonia

Begonia hemsleyana: SPECIES TALK – MARCH MEETING


Begonia hemsleyana, Bot. Mag. 125: t. 7685 (1899).
Source: Curtis Botanical Magazine; Author: Hooker

Carmel Browne presented the Species Talk on 16 March 2013.

The area of distribution of this species extends from northern Burma to the Chinese province of Yunnan in moist, upland forests.

B. hemsleyana was introduced to Kew Gardens by way of seed collected in south Yunnan in 1899. It was named in honour of William Hemsley who worked on Chinese plants at Kew at that time.

B. hemsleyana is rhizomatous, jointed at or below the soil with erect stems. The leaf blade is palmately compound, glossy green, sparsely hairy between the veins, paler green beneath with a reddish tinge. The petioles are pink with short, woolly hairs. Flowers are pink and fragrant.

I chose to speak on this species today because this is only the second time it has flowered for me. It has been described as difficult. From my experiences, I have found it requires a cool, moist, well lit situation with good air movement. Because it naturally produces short, closely spaced stems, good air circulation is essential to keep fungal diseases at bay. A well-drained premium mix that is allowed to dry between waterings suits B. hemsleyana.

B. hemsleyana, B. rex, B. pedatifida and B. circumlobata are closely related and all belong to section Platycentrum. B. hemsleyana has been successfully crossed with Rex Cultorum begonias. B. ‘Raspberry Swirl’, B. ‘Picasso’ and B. ‘Hula Skirt’ are the results of such crossings. I do not know if these have ever been grown in Australia.

Begonias, Begonias


Forest Garden

I love begonias.  That may sound like a strange obsession for a “forest gardener”, but it is my strange obsession.

I remember buying a hanging basket of blooming angel wing Begonias with tiny dark burgundy and green  leaves at the  farmer’s market when I was living in a third floor walk up.  It made my small screened in porch more beautiful, and made me happy.  Since then, I’ve always had a soft spot for adding beautiful begonia plants to my collection.

There are thousands of cultivars in the genus Begonia.  Whether grown for their outrageous leaves or their abundant bright flowers, Begonias can be found from tiny to tremendous.

Begonias work in a forest garden because they appreciate shade.  Although some, like the new Dragon Wing cultivars and Begonia “Bolivienses” can take hours of sun each day, most are quite happy growing in permanent shade.  They also require very little care.  Most like to…

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Betty Vander Poorten’s Begonia Collection


Begonias Grown by a Queensland Begonia Society Member

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Mrs Betty Vander Poorten has been a member of the Queensland Begonia Society for many years, during which she has grown numerous begonia cultivars in green houses built by her husband, Hals.

CULTURE NOTES – APRIL MEETING (from Winter Journal 2011)

I was introduced to the world of begonias when a friend gave me a piece of a gorgeous B. ‘Silver Jewell’ she had in her home. Soon after we went to an open garden at Victoria Point where there was a lovely B. listada. The owner very generously gave me a piece of her plant. I was seriously ‘hooked’ when I went to the annual Begonia Show soon after. My family is surprised that my interest has not waned!

I have over the years tried various growing mediums and have now arrived at putting down my leaves in either washed river sand only or a mix of two parts washed river sand, one part Perlite and one part coir peat. The latter mix I find is excellent for cane cuttings. I find that if I use a root growing hormone powder or pure unadulterated honey to dip the cuttings in, it encourages quicker propagation. Unlike my earlier efforts, I now wait until the plants are really well established before I transplant them.

I now take care not to overpot. I also use small stones to weight the plants down, instead of using sate sticks.

I have lost many begonias by being too generous with feeding. Every so often, I use Confidor to prevent bugs and caterpillars from feeding on them. I use Baycor for mildew and have recently started using a concentrated form of Seasol called Eco-Cweed. This is in powder form. Half a teaspoon is dissolved in a little water and added to a litre of water. This is very good value and does not smell as much. Of course, it also takes up less space and is a lot easier than shaking a large quantity of liquid Seasol.

Happy gardening.

Betty Vander Poorten

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All photos were taken by Click here to contact SoundEagle (Webmaster and Designer)SoundEagle in the summer morning between 10.39am and 10.52am on 18th (Tuesday) of December 2012 at Mrs Betty Vander Poorten’s home garden.

 

Begonia Iron Cross


Higgs Nursery

Begonia Iron Cross

Rarely since the 1980’s has this Begonia delighted our home decor.  It’s brilliant leaf markings and structure are pleasing to the eye and draw remarks from many that appreciate Begonia varieties.  Perfect for that outdoor living room or any other shaded position.

BegIronX email3628

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Begonia, yang Indah dan Berkhasiat


Click here to contact SoundEagleSoundEagle translates from Indonesian into English:

Begonia that can be found in West Sumatra (photo: naturasumatrana)

Begonia, which is beautiful and Efficacious

Single Nawa | Kompas.com, 29 April 2013

A total of 313 species of begonia collection in the Eka Karya Bedugul Botanical Garden, Bali, has now become the most comprehensive in the world and easily enjoyed in a begonia garden measuring 700 square meters. The begonia is the only plant with asymmetrical leaves, as well as an ornamental plant that has not been much observed. Begonia (Begoniaceae) as an ornamental plant in Indonesia is not yet popular. However, this plant is in great demand in several countries to the extent that many associations are formed by begonia fans,” said Hartutiningsih, a begonia researcher at the Center for Plant Conservation at the Bogor Botanical Garden, the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), beginning in April 2013, at the Eka Karya Bedugul Botanical Garden, Bali.
Specific characteristics of the leaf blade that is asymmetrical (begoniifolia) is one of the exotic traits of begonias, in addition to the forms and colours. Begonias in nature grow wild in watery habitats near rivers. Various types of begonias are also easily found around waterfalls. Begonia diversity in the world is estimated to be 1,600 species, distributed in the tropics and subtropics. According to Hartutiningsih, there are more than 200 types of begonias in Indonesia. There are 15 types of natural begonia known in Java; Sumatra (35), Borneo (40), Sulawesi (20) and Papua (70). Begonias in nature grow in different altitudes ranging from humid tropical forests on the plains to mountains 2,400 meters above sea level.

Collection

The begonia collection in Eka Karya began in 2001. Taking an eight-year effort to create, this collection of the Botanical Garden cultivated at an elevation of 1,250 meters above sea level is the most complete in the world. “We did not declare the collection of begonias to be the most comprehensive in the world,” said Hartutiningsih. Based on the writings of Hoover (2008) at the World Center of Begonia, the Botanical Garden of Bali has the most comprehensive begonia collection in the world. In Eka Karya, the begonia collection started from only five species. For the sake of increasing the number of collections, among others, explorations of a number of island flora and seed exchanges with other botanical gardens have been conducted between this botanical garden and Jardin Botanic Garden (BG), France; Glassgow BG, Scotland; Queen Sirikit BG, Thailand; BG Tubingen, Germany; American Begonia Society Tonkawa, United States, and New England Tropical Conservatory, England.
From 313 begonias collected, there is a division into 100 types of natural begonias and 213 types of exotic begonias as a result of crossing. Additional collection occurred in the 2006-2009 period of exploration on the islands of Sulawesi and Papua. In Papua, the exploration was done in the West Batanta Island Nature Reserve, Raja Ampat, West Papua. Resulting from scientific descriptions, there are now 20 hitherto unknown new species being published in international journals. There are still many other types that have not been scientifically described. Crossbreeding research was also conducted to produce a new type of begonia with attractive physical appearance and better than its parent, unique, and has stronger endurance. Cross-breeding is done by cross-pollination. Begonias are generally self-pollinated.
In 2005, Hartutiningsih crossed Begonia acetosa and Begonia listada. The new cultivar is named Begonia Tuti-Siregar. “Tuti” is the new name coined by Hartutiningsih, while “Siregar” is the name of her husband, Mustaid Siregar, the head of the Bogor Botanical Garden. This new cultivar has been registered in the American Begonia Society. Crosses continued to be created in 2007, from female flowers of Begonia puspitae and male flowers of Begonia pasamanensis, producing Begonia Lovely-Jo. Its leaves are uniquely egg-shaped like dilated hearts (of love), asymmetrical, light green and hairless. This new kind of begonia has received Plant Variety Protection (PVP) Rights from the Centre for Plant Variety Protection and Licensing of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture. In 2013, there is going to be a scheduled BUSS test of novelty, uniqueness, uniformity and stability.

Medicinal plants

The distinctiveness of begonias creates potential in these plants. Some of them even have the potential to be medicinal plants. According to Hartutiningsih, who is currently still working on some kind of begonia research, begonias as medicinal plants can supposedly cure several diseases, including fever and the venereal disease syphilis. There are begonias that contain laxatives or substances to treat upset stomach. Begonia glabra is alleged to have medicinal properties for healing new wounds. Its leaves, stems and flowers contain saponins. Its leaves contain tannins, while its stems and flowers contain flavonoids and polyphenols.
Begonia fimbristipula efficaciously reduces temperature/fever, and is a cough medicine and pain medicine in coming months. This type of medicine has been processed into a fresh drink, a somewhat bitter tea from China. Begonia multangula and Begonia robusta with the local name hariang is used by Sundanese people in West Java as a substitute for vegetable acid. Begonia baliensis Girmansyah is a source of traditional medicine used to relieve cough and throat. It contains active compounds that can inhibit the growth of bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Not only exotic. Begonias also contain a lot of other benefits. Science can reveal them.

Source: Kompas

 

Natura Tropicae

Begonia
Begonia yang dapat ditemukan di Sumatera Barat (photo: naturasumatrana)

Begonia, yang Indah dan Berkhasiat

Nawa Tunggal | Kompas.com, 29 April 2013

Sebanyak 313 jenis begonia koleksi Kebun Raya Eka Karya Bedugul, Bali, kini jadi yang terlengkap di dunia dan mudah dinikmati di sebuah Taman Begonia seluas 700 meter persegi. Begonia satu-satunya tumbuhan dengan daun tak simetris, sekaligus tanaman hias yang belum banyak dilirik. Begonia (Begoniaceae) sebagai tanaman hias memang belum populer di Indonesia. Namun, tanaman ini diminati di beberapa negara sampai-sampai banyak terbentuk asosiasi penggemar begonia,” kata Hartutiningsih, peneliti begonia pada Pusat Konservasi Tumbuhan Kebun Raya Bogor Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia (LIPI), awal April 2013, di Kebun Raya Eka Karya Bedugul, Bali.

Ciri-ciri spesifik helai daun yang tak simetris (begoniifolia) menjadi salah satu eksotisme begonia, selain corak dan warna-warninya. Begonia alam tumbuh liar di habitat berair seperti sekitar sungai. Beraneka jenis begonia juga mudah dijumpai di sekitar air terjun. Keragaman…

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‘Aka’aka’awa refugium


Studia Mirabilium

akaakaawaI was super excited to finally come across this cool native plant. This is the sole native begonia to Hawai’i: ‘Aka’aka’awa (Hillebrandia sandwicensis). I personally like to say it in the same cadence as the name of a certain young mongoose in a certain Rudyard Kipling story. This plant is currently only found on Kaua’i, Maui and Molokai. Hillebrand (for whom the plant is named) recorded it once back in the 1880’s on Mt. Ka’ala on O’ahu.

The genetics (Clement, 2004) seem to show that this plant may have quite the story to tell. For ‘Aka’aka’awa maybe the last of its line, one whose unique evolutionary history may stretch back to just after the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. Some advertisers have it wrong. Move over cycads… ‘Aka’aka’awa is the true prehistoric plant of Hawai’i.

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Marty DeHart Introducing Begonias


Marty DeHart shows viewers what the plant breeders have been doing in the wonderful world of begonias.