Tag Archive | Rex Begonia

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias


Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias
Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: This is grown in canada and I took several years to create. The flowers are not on the rhizome, but on the elongated stems. The stems are not flat to the soil in this hybrid. This is not FAKE! 23 February at 02:14

John Boggan Very interesting, I’ve never seen a double-fllowered rex hybrid but there’s no reason why they shouldn’t exist. Come to think of it, I can’t think of any begonia from any of the Asian groups that have double flowers.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses Sorry Ive not replied, James Missier, the rex line I was working with had a few flowers with extra tiny petals, so over the years I kept selecting and backcrossing these. The originals came from my mum, who was a begonias nut for years. They were not named back then, and so complex that the actual ID was obscure even then. Of course when I started to see results the excitement rose and a veritable sweat broke upon my weary brow, but I kept going. It’s all about the journey of discovery. These are addictive. About lowland growing I don’t know where you live, I don’t have any knowledge how they would do, but my summers are hot and dry. No mildew problems at all, so far. Cheers!

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias [1]

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: Yes but have not sold any, just playing with it to see the best ways. The line also was selected for years to have flowers on top. I think the poor rex bunch have been a bit messed up with breeders not wanting to see flowers, or maybe the flowers were not long lasting so I understand this from a growers viewpoint. I wanted to change all that and have both long lasting flowers that were presented on top.

Mcleod Valley Greenhouses: John Boggan, thanks for your thoughts. Here is an experimental cross with tuberous. Only one or two in a thousand turned out to have decent flowers that lasted and were of quality.

Experimental Cross of Rex and Tuberous Begonias [2]

Begonias, Begonias


Forest Garden

I love begonias.  That may sound like a strange obsession for a “forest gardener”, but it is my strange obsession.

I remember buying a hanging basket of blooming angel wing Begonias with tiny dark burgundy and green  leaves at the  farmer’s market when I was living in a third floor walk up.  It made my small screened in porch more beautiful, and made me happy.  Since then, I’ve always had a soft spot for adding beautiful begonia plants to my collection.

There are thousands of cultivars in the genus Begonia.  Whether grown for their outrageous leaves or their abundant bright flowers, Begonias can be found from tiny to tremendous.

Begonias work in a forest garden because they appreciate shade.  Although some, like the new Dragon Wing cultivars and Begonia “Bolivienses” can take hours of sun each day, most are quite happy growing in permanent shade.  They also require very little care.  Most like to…

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Betty Vander Poorten’s Begonia Collection


Begonias Grown by a Queensland Begonia Society Member

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Mrs Betty Vander Poorten has been a member of the Queensland Begonia Society for many years, during which she has grown numerous begonia cultivars in green houses built by her husband, Hals.

CULTURE NOTES – APRIL MEETING (from Winter Journal 2011)

I was introduced to the world of begonias when a friend gave me a piece of a gorgeous B. ‘Silver Jewell’ she had in her home. Soon after we went to an open garden at Victoria Point where there was a lovely B. listada. The owner very generously gave me a piece of her plant. I was seriously ‘hooked’ when I went to the annual Begonia Show soon after. My family is surprised that my interest has not waned!

I have over the years tried various growing mediums and have now arrived at putting down my leaves in either washed river sand only or a mix of two parts washed river sand, one part Perlite and one part coir peat. The latter mix I find is excellent for cane cuttings. I find that if I use a root growing hormone powder or pure unadulterated honey to dip the cuttings in, it encourages quicker propagation. Unlike my earlier efforts, I now wait until the plants are really well established before I transplant them.

I now take care not to overpot. I also use small stones to weight the plants down, instead of using sate sticks.

I have lost many begonias by being too generous with feeding. Every so often, I use Confidor to prevent bugs and caterpillars from feeding on them. I use Baycor for mildew and have recently started using a concentrated form of Seasol called Eco-Cweed. This is in powder form. Half a teaspoon is dissolved in a little water and added to a litre of water. This is very good value and does not smell as much. Of course, it also takes up less space and is a lot easier than shaking a large quantity of liquid Seasol.

Happy gardening.

Betty Vander Poorten

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All photos were taken by Click here to contact SoundEagle (Webmaster and Designer)SoundEagle in the summer morning between 10.39am and 10.52am on 18th (Tuesday) of December 2012 at Mrs Betty Vander Poorten’s home garden.

 

Marty DeHart Introducing Begonias


Marty DeHart shows viewers what the plant breeders have been doing in the wonderful world of begonias.

Edible Begonias


Learn about wild food with Green Deane. This video presents the begonia as an edible plant that has been grown around the world both as food and as an ornamental.


For more information including the culinary and medicinal uses of begonias as well as the recipes of “Begonia Tartlett” and “Begonia Spread“, visit Begonia Bonanza | Eat The Weeds and other things, too.

Culinary uses are found in Japan, India, Indonesia (a sauce for meat and fish), Myanmar, China (tea, salads and wild snack), Brazil, Mexico, Paraguay and the Philippines. For example, the leaves of Begonia fimbristipula, a deciduous herb with tubers 7-8 mm in diameter, are harvested and dried for brewing a beverage (tea) in Guangdong, China.

The Journal of Economic Botany has mentioned the following edible begonias:

  1. B. annulata (aka B. hatacoa)
  2. B. auriculata
  3. B. barbata
  4. B. fimbristipula (used to make a tea)
  5. B. gracilis
  6. B. grandis var evansiana
  7. B. hernandioides
  8. B. malabarica
  9. B. mannii
  10. B. palmata
  11. B. picta
  12. B. plebeja (stems peeled, sap is used to make a drink)
  13. B. rex
  14. B. roxburghii (cooked)
  15. B. semperflorens

>Begonias in the Winter Window


Logee's Plants for Home & Garden Blog

>Begonias in the Winter Window are a perfect topic this time of year. As Iwalked through our greenhouses today, what really caught my attention were the many varieties of begonias that were just popping with color and form. The Angel Wing

Begonias, named for their leaves that look like Angel’s wings were in the forefront of my vision. Their white dotted leaves looked like they were ready to take flight. The Rex Begonias, with their swirled patterned leaves and the Rhizomatous Begonias that have flowers growing above the foliage were every bit as impressive.

All three types of Begonias are present in the picture above. This begonia display, in one of our seven retail greenhouses, shows the large Angel Wing specimen called Begonia maculata var. ‘Wightii’. The white spots on the leaves are characteristic of ‘Whightii’ and would

challenge even the most detail-oriented artist. The begonia with…

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Rex Begonias: Parenchyma and Propagation


The Green Thumb 2.0

Rex begonias – the “king” of the begonias – are plants with their own unique look. These begonias aren’t grown for their blossoms; they’re grown for their foliage which comes in various shapes and colors. Rex begonias are great houseplants and they grow well in outside pots in semi-shaded areas.

What I find interesting about these begonias is the way that you can propagate them. Stem cuttings of these plants root easily but the most common way to multiply rex begonias is by using leaf cuttings.

To do this, you simply take a begonia leaf, turn it over and make a small cut across each of the main leaf veins. Then you place the leaf on potting medium right side up and use pebbles or floral pins to ensure that the back of the leaf is in contact with the medium. Within a month, small plants will begin to grow…

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